Ellen Steen

Ellen Steen

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The power was out on Aug. 12. Fortunately, the PUD had sent out postcards in advance, so we had our cooler ready with food for lunch. What was going on? Reconductering. I don’t know about you, but that’s a term I had never heard before. It means replacing wires and poles as needed. We should be all set to weather the stormy fall and winter now; thank you, PUD!

If you’d like to get a new look at the neighborhood, download the Google Street View app on your smartphone. Jack Drafahl has posted 49 VR images of Cape Meares there (also 40 of the Solomon Islands). VR photography stands for virtual reality photography, which is the interactive viewing of panoramic (360 degrees/spherical) photographs. These Google Earth images are fascinating to look at—and I’m not the only one who thinks so. As of Aug. 1, Jack has had over one million views of his 439 images. Check it out!

Looking for more reading material during the pandemic? David Dittmer recommends an anecdotal history of Tillamook County entitled “The Adventures of Dr. Huckleberry” by Evermont Robbins Huckleberry, M.D. Dr. Huckleberry is a well-known historical figure in Tillamook County. He was in general medical practice here for nearly 30 years and was so beloved that an annual county health fair, the Oregon Huckleberry Health Fair, was named after him. He lived until the ripe old age of 102, passing away September 28, 1996. “The Adventures of Dr. Huckleberry: Tillamook County, Oregon” was reprinted for the third time by the Oregon Historical Society in 2017. You may pick up a copy at the Garibaldi Museum or the Tillamook County Pioneer Museum; I just got one myself. Thank you for the recommendation, David!

Dolores “DeeDee” and Duane Grayson are hanging up their fishing rods. Although Duane still has that sparkle in his eyes, at 89 the physical tasks of boating and fishing have gotten too onerous. But, boy, do they have the memories! Duane boated a 50-pound salmon in the Wilson tidewater in 1964. And, more recently, he caught a 34-pound salmon in 2017. By then, however, he was fishing with DeeDee—and she outdid him that year. She fought a huge salmon from the grassy banks in Tillamook Bay upriver past the oyster house, finally bringing in the 46-pound monster. Friend Bill Bolster stopped fishing and followed them as the battle took place, snapping a picture of DeeDee when she finally got that giant in. Thanks, DeeDee and Duane, for sharing those good memories as well as 11 packages of bait for fall Chinook season. We will share both the recollections and bait with our mutual friends on the water.

I ran into a woman from Bend on one of my recent beach walks. She and her family had rented a house her to celebrate her mother’s 67th birthday (same age I am). This was the first time she had ever visited Cape Meares. “It’s a hidden gem!” she exclaimed, and then said she wasn’t going to tell anyone else about it. Good!

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