Ocean waves.JPG

The Oregon Coast is lined with beautiful scenes such as this one.

Approximately 41 percent of Oregon’s 362-mile coastline is made up of rocky habitat. Most visitors would recognize the dramatic headlands, tide pools, rocky beaches, cliffs, and offshore rocks while they are traveling along Highway 101.

These sites are managed by multiple state and federal agencies using a coordinated framework, known as the Territorial Sea Plan. Part 3 of this plan, the Rocky Habitat Management Strategy, aims to help sustain and support the use and health of rocky habitat resources. This strategy is currently undergoing an update to assure its goals are being met and your input is needed!

The update process is currently nearing a critical point, where individuals and organizations will have an opportunity to submit proposals for additions, removals, and changes to rock habitat management designations. Before opening up this proposal process, the state of Oregon invites you to view and submit comments on the draft strategy and mapping tool that will guide the proposal process, beginning February 1, 2020.

The State of Oregon invites all individuals, organizations, and governments to participate in this process so that as many voices as possible are heard. Multiple opportunities are available to submit comments and suggestions to this update. The public comment period is from February 1 – March 1, 2020. Written comments can be submitted via email to: TSP.Comments@state.or.us

Review the draft strategy: http://bit.ly/37IHF25

Review the Rocky Habitat Mapping Tool: http://oregon.seasketch.org/

All public comment must be submitted by 11:59pm on March 1, 2020.

Please visit https://OregonOcean.info for more information and updates, including a schedule of upcoming public presentations.

The Oregon Coastal Management Program (OCMP) is a small federally recognized program housed within the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD). Originating from the Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA), we work in partnership with local coastal and tribal governments, state and federal agencies, and other stakeholders to ensure that Oregon’s coastal and ocean resources are managed, conserved, and developed consistent with statewide planning goals.

The OCMP has been charged by the Legislature with managing coastal areas and the resources for the existing and future benefits that they hold. This is codified under Oregon’s Land Use Planning Goal 19: The Ocean Resources Goal - which states all agency actions within Oregon must “conserve marine resources and ecological function for the purpose of providing long-term ecological, economic, and social value and benefits to future generations.”

Oregon’s statewide land use planning program — originated in 1973 under Senate Bill 100 — protects farm and forest lands, conserves natural resources, promotes livable communities, facilitates orderly and efficient development, helps coordination among local governments, and enables citizen involvement. The program affords all Oregonians predictability and sustainability to the development process by allocating land for industrial, commercial and housing development, as well as transportation and agriculture.

The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) administers the program. A seven-member volunteer citizen board known as the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) guides DLCD. Under the program, all cities and counties have adopted comprehensive plans that meet mandatory state standards. The standards are 19 Statewide Planning Goals that deal with land use, development, housing, transportation, and conservation of natural resources. Periodic review of plans and technical assistance in the form of grants to local jurisdictions are key elements of the program.

Find more information online at https://www.oregon.gov/lcd.

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